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The Cornish Mermaids And A Visit To Clovelly, North Devon England

Thursday, January 17, 2019


My dear friends,

Pour some tea and let us take a little visit to Clovelly. If you are such as I and adore England I'm most assured you'll adore this post.
A Cornish mermaid statue in the local pub.



When I was on Instagram I became close friends with a gal named Bridgette from England. She knows I adore England and mermaids, so she was kind enough to send me a batch of her personal photos on her latest jaunt to Clovelly, North Devon. 
Me at the lighthouse. I thought it fitting for this particular post.

Here is a bit of folklore on Cornish mermaids. 

"The mermaids along the shores of Cornwall are trickier and more sinister than most others and their mermen are less friendly, even to their own family. 

The mermen have been known to eat their own children. If caught by fishermen, the Cornish mermaid had to grant three wishes, but she usually managed to drown her captor before he could get back to shore. Avoid Cornish mermaids as they are dangerous and bring troubles with them. " {excerpt from Magickal Mermaids and Water Creatures} Buy the book here. 

Antique Scarlette Rose MerryMaid dolls that my dear friend Bridgette from England made for my book launch. I still have 2 left if you'd like to purchase one{here}.
Kingsley Museum 
Have you ever read The Water Babies, a  fairytale for a land baby by Charles Kingsley, 1862?

The book was extremely popular in England among British children's literature.  Charles lived in Clovelly, North Devon and this is where Kingsley Museum is located.  
Upon entering the cottage of Charles Kingsley there is a wax figure of him writing to his dear love. 
The great Victorian writer who loved Clovelly. Kingsley museum is a short walk down the cobbled street. Charles first came to the village in 1831 at the age of 11. His father was curate and then rector until 1836, and Charles and his two brothers enjoyed an idyllic boyhood around the village. Clovelly and North Devon were powerful and lifelong influences on Kingsley. He would return often for literary inspiration. 

A sweet little bird.
9th~ 13th Century

Clovelly has been associated with just three families since the middle of the 13th century, a period of nearly 800 years.

From the mid-1880s the village was rescued from decay and restored by the lady of the village, Mrs Chrisistine Hamlyn.

There are many things to do in Clovelly, there are activities to workshops.

You can walk down the cobbled streets and look at all of the residential cottages.

There are craft shops, where you can make something from pottery. You can even take a fishing or chartered trip.
You can enjoy a view with a little grilling out and a glass of wine with your beloved. Watch the waves ebb and flow. There is nothing more romantic, especially after sundown. 

There is a lifeboat station and Clovelly court gardens that are exquisitely breathtaking.

I adore the British bunting.




Not to be missed is the Clovelly Donkeys. 
Clovelly Donkeys
Without the donkeys, the village could never have been a successful fishing port. It was these sturdy little beasts that carried the heavy baskets. Culm {coal} was taken to the Lime Kiln and herring were taken up the narrow cobbled street to the carriers carts at the top.

Today the donkeys lead a much more restful existence, giving children rides during the summer months and posing for photographs. Nowadays the villagers, postmen and suppliers use sledges to transport their loads.

Little cottages along the road.


Fisherman's Cottage
Fishermans Cottage is found walking along a path by the side of the cottage where the Kingsley Museum is.

Inside this little cottage, you can see how a Clovelly fisherman and his family lived in the 1930's. There are domestic treasures of the period, including simple cottage furniture, colourful pictures, china, ornaments and religious engravings. The tiny kitchen is plain but full of period charm.  Like all early cottages in the village, it is built in cob and stone. The stones are from the beach, then a layer of cob {earth mixed with a little straw}.

Clovelly's fishing heritage for centuries the main occupation has been and still is made from the Sea.

I hope you delighted in this post. I am sure it's most dandy in person. It's now on my list of venues to see. Of course, only after I visit Hilltop, the home of Beatrix Potter.

I shall write again soon.

Most affably yours til my next swim, Raquelxxx

4 comments :

  1. Thank you for stopping by my blog, and for leaving a comment!!!! Thus, I have found your lovely blog.

    Oh mercy, what a fantastic place to visit. It has everything! History, quaintness, beautiful places to see, old and twisted stairs and streets, and a gorgeous sea side. Ohhhhhh...!!!! Thank-you, to your friend and to you, for sharing all this, with us.

    You live in Carmel-By-The-Sea. Ohhhhhhhh... -be still my heart- :-) I was there once, but a quick stop and did not get the chance to see the beeeeeeeautiful homes. -sigh-sigh-sigh- But I have seen them, on the net. And I'm sure I will see yours, here on your blog.

    Ahhhh, you got rid of Netflix too!!!! After watching what you wanted to watch. ,-))) Yes, our library system has so many things to take out. Why pay? Especially when NF offers some fun things, but so many *Ughhhhhhhh* things.

    Again, so happy to meet you!

    'Wisps of Words'
    ✨✨✨✨

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    1. Thank you dear friend. Yes, I figured that it's better for my mind if I spend less time on tv and more time on lovely homemaking particulars. I will post pictures so very soon... of all thats bubbling up on my side of the ocean... Thank you for your kind words... I truly appreciate it.

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  2. Thank you for stopping by I do live in Scotland but it is an Island off the West Coast of Scotland the Isle of Lewis, which was a dream for many years. We love to holiday in Florida and have covered lots of areas, we are great fans of the Theme parks as well as the flora and fauna. A joy to visit your blog today and admire the stunning setting in your photographs along and learn a little about the area.

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    1. Oh my the flora and fauna... I concur... I am so happy to hear it, that you love Florida. Please do contact me if you're ever in the area. I would love to meet you one day. I am so happy you got your dream of living where you've dreamt of. Isn't it delightful to live a dream?

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